How the Tide Pod Challenge Represents the Internet

Hello My Imaginary Friends,

Let’s start this out with; Yes this trend is happening and it’s very dangerous and extremely stupid.

The American Poison Control Centers have reported over 700 cases of teens eating the candy coloured poison pods this year alone.

Does that sound like a lot? A national emergency? Something that people will make fun of for years to come? Apparently.

The story for the Tide Pod Challenge is as colourful and alluring as the pods themselves. It’s a great way to make fun of Gen Z and Millennials. However, like most things, it’s only reported everywhere and laughed about because it’s easy.

700 cases sounds like a lot right? It is nothing compared to the cases of children under 5 eating them. Every year since 2012, over 7500 cases are reported.

Consumer Reports: The problem with laundry detergent pods

Why is this the first time we’re hearing about it? Because it’s not flashy and fits into the current overwhelming Juvenoia.

It’s a perfect example of the way our social and news media deal with reality through a funhouse mirror. They cover Colin Kaepernick’s protest and ask if it’s anti-american instead of covering the countless useless deaths of black people. They cover the White Nationalist protests by asking whether it’s okay to call them Nazi’s instead of asking if it’s okay for them to march for a cause that would see millions of people killed.

It’s not fake news, it’s sensationalist news, and it’s nothing new. Look past what a few talking heads and meme creators tell you and think about what is going on.

So next time you see a funny meme about how kids these days do stupid stuff, ask yourself why it’s funny and if maybe it’s the wrong focus?

Later Days,



PBS: Kids got sick eating detergent long before the Tide Pod Challenge

New York Times: Yes, People Really Are Eating Tide Pods. No, It’s Not Safe.

Consumer Reports: The problem with laundry detergent pods