Blush: Candy is not a toy

Are you looking to spice up the bedroom this Valentine’s Day?

Keep looking past the grocery store.

Candy is not safe to use!

Image from stock photos.

While your first thought might go to chocolate, whipped cream, hard candies, and fruit, all of these things (and a lot of others that don’t pop up in Cosmo’s “recommended sex foods”) are not safe for one very good and major reason: sugar should not go anywhere near the mucous membranes of the vagina or anus.

Sugar can change the pH of the vagina, and is a food source for bacteria and yeast, leading to yeast infections and other problems.

Coconut oil is very popular, and I’ve heard it suggested as a use for anything from cradle cap to an ingredient in stir fry. But do NOT use it as a lube! If you are using it with a latex condom/dental dam, oil can degrade the latex. If you are not using a condom/dental dam, you’d think that the slipperiness of the oil would be an ideal lubricant. Unfortunately, the oil is hard to remove completely from inside the body, and it can trap bacteria, increasing the risk of infections.

Fruits and veggies should NOT be inserted into the body (other than your mouth), unless inside latex. For one thing, there’s no guarantee that you’d be able to remove all of it – your internal muscles are stronger than you realize, and having to go to the doctor’s to have a piece of food removed from inside you isn’t the best way to spend your evening. Secondly, no matter how thoroughly you think you may have disinfected the food, there is still a chance of bacteria on the skin.

The safest way to use food, even the ones with sugar, would be to keep it above the waist. If you insist on bringing something down below, use plain ice. Avoid direct contact, as the nerve endings are much closer to the surface and can be “traumatized”.

There are several safe products that can be used down below, but you may have some difficulty finding them in the condom aisle of your drugstore. Sex shops like Venus Envy or Wicked Wanda’s in downtown Ottawa are safe spaces for all genders and orientations (although you may have some difficulty entering the latter if you are mobility impaired, Venus Envy has an automatic front door and is accessible as stated online), and they would have edible lubricants and other products that could be fun. Unfortunately, these products are still a work in progress:

[I]t’s hard to balance taste with safety. The ingredients that bring flavor (sucrose, sodium saccharin, aspartame) can also cause yeast infections – or lead to genital irritation – Atlas Obscura

Happy Valentine’s Day, and be safe!


References

https://www.self.com/story/7-ways-not-to-use-food-during-sex

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/a-matter-of-taste-inside-the-edible-sex-toy-industry


If you’re enjoying the Blush blogs, consider learning more with Blush: The Card Game from Renaissance Press.

Blush: Pride

Blush’s kickstarter is doing well, but we still have a long way to go, and about two weeks left! Please keep harassing your friends and family, and add neighbours into the mix! Let’s make this game a reality!

Pride flag. Image from i.telegraph.co.uk
Pride flag. Image from i.telegraph.co.uk

Algonquin College, my school, has their Pride Week this week. I had the opportunity to attend a workshop yesterday afternoon, given by the fantastic people at Venus Envy Ottawa (Facebook, Twitter), on Bi/Pan/Poly relationships. The speakers were very well educated and gave thoughtful and insightful answers to all our questions. I thoroughly enjoyed myself and learned a lot.

This is what Pride means to me. As an Ally, I sometimes feel adjacent to what the Pride movement stands for. I loved the inclusiveness that taking part in something as minor as a workshop gave to me. On top of feeling as though I belonged, I was able to learn more about how to respect people in those relationships previously mentioned, and how to break through the myths surrounding the stereotypes.

Pride Week, to an Ally like me, is about education on different types of relationships and sexualities. It is about showing support and respect to everyone. It is about welcoming other human beings and accepting them for who they are.

Thank you for such a great workshop. I definitely won’t forget it!

Algonquin’s Pride Week will continue today and tomorrow, and has various workshops free to the public. Check out their calendar of events here.